Dog Potty Training

Training your dog to use the PetLawn is much like teaching it any kind of trick. It takes repetition and positive reinforcement for the dog to learn. It is true that puppies learn more quickly than older dogs, but the popular adage that "you can't teach an old dog new tricks" certainly doesn't hold up here. Older dogs just require a bit more repetition and patience to learn.

The easiest method of training your dog to use the PetLawn is to place it on top of the grass at the times when you would normally let it out to do its business. Keep your dog on the PetLawn until it succeeds in relieving itself. Your dog wants to please you, so immediately praise your dog and reward it with a treat when it uses the PetLawn successfully. Praise and reward is the most important aspect of training your dog to use the PetLawn.

"Teaching my little guy was a breeze! He learned almost instantly." - Laura
dog potty
dog potty

Ideally, during the first few days of learning to use the PetLawn your dog should either be with you, or confined to a limited area with the PetLawn close at hand. If you notice actions such as circling or sniffing (usually indicating the dog has "to go"), then encourage your dog to go to his area to do his business on the PetLawn. It may also be helpful to use a key word or key phrase for this action. It can be anything you want such as: "go pee", "get busy", etc. Repeat the word or phrase often at the spot where the dog should do her business.

Another tool for training your dog to use the PetLawn is to take advantage of its natural instinct to mark its territory. As you've probably noticed while walking your dog, it will sniff the grass and try to urinate on top of the spot where another dog previously marked its territory. It order to use this instinct in your favor, consider collecting some of your dog's or another dog's urine with a paper towel. Rub the moist paper towel over the PetLawn grass to transfer the scent. Encourage your dog to mark its territory and be sure to follow up with positive reinforcement.